Paris museums are offering to sell off its collection of ancient Egyptian paintings, sculptures and other artworks to make way for the construction of a new exhibition hall.

The Louvre in Paris, the Louvre Museum in the US and the Guggenheim Museum in Berlin have all agreed to sell their works, which include works by Picasso, Monet, Vermeer, Verlhout and others, to the National Gallery of France (NGF).

“We are now ready to sell all of our works, in accordance with the agreed condition of the NGF,” said NGF chief architect Claude Liguori.

The new exhibition halls will have a total of 12 exhibitions, but the new exhibition spaces will not be built yet, Liguiori said. “

This is our first step towards opening the museum in Paris.”

The new exhibition halls will have a total of 12 exhibitions, but the new exhibition spaces will not be built yet, Liguiori said.

“We are preparing the necessary conditions and we hope to open them in December,” he added.

“The NGF has already approved the terms of the sale of the Paris collection.”

The Louvin Museum in Paris has agreed to buy its work from the NGH.

The Guggeberg Museum in Germany has agreed with the Louvain to sell its works, while the National Academy of Sciences in Vienna has agreed.

In January, the NGA agreed to acquire the museum’s artworks for the NDF, a public trust.

The sale was announced in February, but details of how the works would be sold were not immediately available.

Art dealers and museums around the world have been pushing for the sale, but in the face of mounting public pressure, some institutions are reluctant to part with their collections.

The museum-based trade body Artnews, which represents dealers and curators, said in a statement that it was “disappointed and disappointed” that the sale would go ahead.

The NGA, which is the country’s largest museum authority, has said that its mission is to preserve, protect and enhance the value of the arts.

“In this regard, it has been the NGS (the National Gallery) which has led the way in the last few years, through its successful acquisitions of the Louveau Collection, which has served as the basis for the establishment of the National Art Collections Agency,” said the Nga in a written statement.

In this context, the sale is a positive step that will allow us to restore and enhance this unique asset of Paris.”

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